persisting:

ok internet, here’s an interruption in your daily rugged white dude dashboard.

this is cykeem white:

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cykeem is an up and coming male model who (i believe) just participated in his first fashion week. he is insanely beautiful.

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i highly recommend you all join me in keeping a close eye in his career trajectory, because he’s an extremely talented model, and he is, imo, shockingly beautiful. everyone likes shockingly beautiful men, right? right.

preeoz:

Anti-blackness is a problem in Korea, the rest of Asia, the whole world. It’s a real problem. We must all speak out and act against it. I try to, every time I see or hear of it. And I’ve lost many “well-meaning” white friends or rich POC friends who want to have a “civil” or “neutral” discussion with me while spouting offensive, age-old colorblind, racist arguments. It’s not a political belief. It’s not an academic debate about ideas. It’s deeply personal and hurtful. This picture made the rounds several days ago on my FB. I felt angry about it. It’s absolutely anti-black racism, especially since white Africans are allowed in.

The problem is, white expats in Korea love to attack Koreans for being racist. They love it. They stirred up an outrage over this photo. They were incensed that their non-existent African friends can’t enter the bar. They’re boycotting the bar despite the owner’s long and unequivocal apology. 

(Never mind their complete ignorance of structural racism in Korea, especially toward laborers from Southeast and South Asia, and Africa, which for some reason doesn’t pique their social justice interests.)

Despite their battle cry and boycotts against Korean racism, when I post about Michael Brown and Ferguson, they turn back into “neutral” and “civil” pseudo-intellectuals, pondering what Brown could have done differently to avoid getting shot. They wonder about black-on-black crime. They say, “Not all cops.” They’re critical thinkers about the statistics that show systemic racism, endemic in the US.

It’s easy to blame “the Koreans” for racism. Or Donald Sterling, or Paula Dean, or on whomever we can pass the blame instead of looking at the white supremacy in our society and in ourselves. 

So, while I think the bar did something very wrong, they apologized. It’s up to Africans to forgive them or not. I’m not saying that we should excuse Korea’s racism problems, because racism is inexcusable. I am saying, that expat social justice warriors need to remember who they’re fighting for or against. Because as non-Africans and non-Koreans, they got no stake in the game.

But especially white Americans? You can speak out and fight for other fellow Americans who don’t look like you. That would be social justice.